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National Coming Out Day
October 1


National Coming Out Day is an internationally-observed civil awareness day for coming out and discussion about gay, lesbian, bisexual, asexual and transgender (LGBT) issues. It is observed by members of the LGBT communities and their supporters ("allies") on October 11 every year. NCOD founders Dr. Rob Eichberg and Jean O'Leary encouraged all people, of all sexual orientations, to "take your next step" in living openly and powerfully on October 11th.

 

 

LINKS:

 

Wikipedia: National Coming Out Day

About Gay Life: National Coming Out Day
What You Need to Know About Natl Coming Out Day
Celebrating National Coming Out Day

Why National Coming Out Day Matters

The Universal Experience of Coming Out

 


National Day of Silence
April 19

 

The Day of Silence is the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network's (GLSEN) annual day of action to protest the bullying and harassment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students and their supporters. Students take a day-long vow of silence to symbolically represent the silencing of LGBT students and their supporters.

 

Founded in 1996, the Day of Silence has become the largest single student-led action towards creating safer schools for all, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. From the first-ever Day of Silence at the University of Virginia in 1996, to the organizing efforts in over 8,000 middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities across the country in 2008, its textured history reflects its diversity in both numbers and reach.

 

 

LINKS:

Wikipedia: Day of Silence
Official Website: Day of Silence

 


LGBT Pride Holidays

Holidays and cultural observances bring people together for both celebration and reflection. Throughout the year, the LGBT community unites in pride and in protest, in recognition of a rich heritage and in hope for the future.  Among the more prominent holidays are National Coming Out Day, LGBT History Month, National Day of Silence, Gay Pride Month, and Stonewall Day.

 

LINKS:

Rainbow Babies: LGBT Holidays & Observances

 


LGBT History Month

October

 

LGBT History Month is a month-long annual observance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history, and the history of the gay rights and related civil rights movements. It is observed during October in the United States, to include National Coming Out Day on October 11. 

 

In the United Kingdom, it is observed during February, to coincide with a major celebration of the 2005 abolition of Section 28, which had the effect of prohibiting schools from discussing LGBT issues or counselling LGBT or questioning youth.

 

LGBT History Month originated in the United States and was first celebrated in 1994. It was founded by Missouri high-school history teacher Rodney Wilson. Among early supporters and members of the first coordinating committee were Kevin Jennings of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN); Kevin Boyer of Gerber/Hart Gay and Lesbian Library and Archives in Chicago; Paul Varnell, writer for the Windy City Times; Torey Wilson, Chicago area teacher; Johnda Boyce, women's studies major at Columbus State University and Jessea Greenman of UC-Berkeley.

 

Many gay and lesbian organizations supported the concept early on. In 1995, the National Education Association indicated support of LGBT History Month as well as other history months by resolution at its General Assembly.

 

October was chosen by Wilson as the month for the celebration because National Coming Out Day already was established as a widely known event, on October 11, and October commemorated the first march on Washington by LGBT people in 1979. LGBT History Month is intended to encourage honesty and openness about being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.


 

LINKS:

 

Wikipedia: LGBT History Month

LGBT History Month

Library of Congress: LGBT Pride Month

Know Your LGBT History

 


LGBT Pride Month

June

 

Gay and Lesbian Pride Month is celebrated each year during the month of June. The last Sunday in June is celebrated as Gay Pride Day. On June 2, 2000, President Bill Clinton declared June "Gay & Lesbian Pride Month".

 

U.S. President Barack Obama declared June 2010 to be Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, stating, “I call upon all Americans to observe this month by fighting prejudice and discrimination in their own lives and everywhere it exists.”

 

The month was chosen to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village that sparked the modern LGBT liberation movement in the United States.  This month is meant to recognize the impact lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people have had on the world. LGBT groups celebrate with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost from hate crimes as well as HIV and AIDS, and other group gathering events that attract thousands upon thousands of individuals.

 

 

LINKS:

 

Wikipedia: Gay Pride Month

Presidential Proclamation: Gay Pride Month

Advocate Mag: Obama Declares June LGBT Pride Month

 


International Day Against Homophobia & Transphobia (IDAHOT)

May 17

 

IDAHOT was created in 2004 to draw the attention of policymakers, opinion leaders, social movements, the public and the media to the violence and discrimination experienced by LGBTI people internationally.  In under a decade, May 17 has established itself the single most important date for LGBTI communities to mobilize on a worldwide scale.

 

 

The Day represents an annual landmark to draw the attention of decision makers, the media, the public, opinion leaders and local authorities to the alarming situation faced by lesbian, gay, bisexuals, transgender and intersex people and all those who do not conform to majority sexual and gender norms.  May 17 is now celebrated in more than 130 countries, including 37 where same-sex acts are illegal, with 1600 events reported from 1280 organizations in 2014. These mobilizations unite millions of people in support of the recognition of human rights for all, irrespective of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

 

The International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia is not one centralized campaign; rather it is a moment that everyone can take advantage of to take action.  The date of May 17th was specifically chosen to commemorate the World Health Organization’s decision in 1990 to declassify homosexuality as a mental disorder.

 

The International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia has received official recognition from several States, international institutions as the European Parliament, and by countless local authorities. Most United Nations agencies also mark the Day with specific events.

 

LINKS:

 

Day Against Homophobia

Homophobes & Transphobes Are Destroying America

 


Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR)

November 20

 

TDOR was established to remember transgender people who were violently murdered. The Transgender Day of Remembrance serves several purposes. It raises public awareness of hate crimes against transgender people, an action that current media doesn’t perform. Day of Remembrance publicly mourns and honors the lives of our brothers and sisters who might otherwise be forgotten.

 

 

Through the vigil, we express love and respect for our people in the face of national indifference and hatred. Day of Remembrance reminds non-transgender people that we are their sons, daughters, parents, friends and lovers. Day of Remembrance gives our allies a chance to step forward with us and stand in vigil, memorializing those of us who’ve died by anti-transgender violence.

 

LINKS:

 

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Remembering Our Dead

 


World AIDS Day
December 1


World AIDS Day, designated on 1 December every year since 1988,is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection, and mourning those who have died of the disease. Government and health officials, non-governmental organizations and individuals around the world observe the day, often with education on AIDS prevention and control.

 

World AIDS Day is one of the eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Malaria Day and World Hepatitis Day. Since 1995, the President of the United States has made an official proclamation on World AIDS Day.

As of 2013, AIDS has killed more than 36 million people worldwide (1981–2012), and an estimated 35.3 million people are living with HIV, making it one of the most important global public health issues in recorded history. Despite recent improved access to antiretroviral treatment in many regions of the world, the AIDS epidemic claims an estimated 2 million lives each year, of which about 270,000 are children.

 

LINKS:

 

World AIDS Day

What is World AIDS Day?

Govt Report: World AIDS Day

History of AIDS/HIV in Posters

CDC: World AIDS Day

 


Stonewall Riots

June 28, 1969

 

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. They are frequently cited as the first instance in American history when people in the homosexual community fought back against a government-sponsored system that persecuted sexual minorities, and they have become the defining event that marked the start of the gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.  Celebration of the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots is called Stonewall Day.

 

 

LINKS:

 

Wikipedia: Stonewall Riots
About: Stonewall Riots
Washington Blade: Stonewall Riots and National History Contest
Stonewall National Museum & Archives

 

 


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ALGBTICAL

Association for Lesbian Gay Bisexual & Transgender Issues in Counseling of Alabama